Denise Fawcett Facey

At its best, education broadens the way students view the world and their place in it.

Winter 2017-2018

Hello Readers,
We’re about to settle into that goofy mid-year period of the school calendar. You know how it goes. Students’ early enthusiasm begins to wane, and they start acting much like winter weather: unpredictable and, sometimes, dreary. What they need is a jump-start for their energy and engagement. Inspiring them to percolate new ideas and exercise their creative muscles, fresh projects and activities are the answer. So here are a few ideas:




In This Issue:
The Bookshelf
Reaching the Whole Child
Parents and Education
Teacher Tips
Education Blog
Odds and Ends


The Bookshelf
Our first book on the shelf this time is David Cohen’s Capturing the Spark: Inspired Teaching, Thriving Schools. Based on Cohen’s observations in more than 70 California schools, this is an inspirational read on ways to captivate students and help them thrive by igniting and propelling their natural curiosity and creativity. It may well light a spark in you, too!

Next up is James Alan Sturtevant’s Hacking Engagement Again. A cornucopia of ideas on student engagement, it picks up where his first book, with a similar title, left off. Sturtevant’s creative tips span grade levels and content areas to underscore his contention that “the first step to real academic achievement is inspiring a love of learning, and the best way to accomplish this is to get students to love your class and your teaching.” I couldn’t agree more.

Then, viewing students from a whole-child perspective in You’ve Got to Reach Them to Teach Them, Mary Kim Schreck lays out ways to create an engaging classroom culture that provides the safety for students to take risks, make mistakes and flourish. What a wonderful atmosphere for learning!

As usual, I don’t know the authors, but as the suggestions in their books enrich the whole child and engage students in innovative ways, they’re certainly worth your time.

Reaching the Whole Child
Speaking of the whole child, that concept is the focus of an entire page on my website. That’s because it’s the foundation for my educational philosophy. As I see it, we can’t merely convey content; we need to care about the entire child. To help educators accomplish this, my Reaching the Whole Child page offers links to a wide array of resources. You never know what you might find if you check it out!

Parents and Education
For parents, I’ve posted a variety of topics — from defusing the power struggles with children of all ages to giving your children more time instead of more gifts — on my Facebook page. If a little help or even a bit of insight is sometimes exactly what you need, check out my page from time to time.

Teacher Tips
Whether it’s opportunities for teaching awards or resources for teaching social justice issues, just to name a few topics, my Facebook page also offers resources for teachers. What you are looking for may be awaiting you on that page so stop by occasionally.

Education Blog
Just because education issues never fail to stir opinions in me, I write a weekly blog on precisely those issues. With recent blog posts ranging from the difference between teaching students and teaching children (yes, there really is a difference!) to the importance of learning students’ names and providing safe, caring learning environments, there’s no dearth of opinion. But your viewpoint would be a definite contribution to the discussion, so please stop by each week.

Odds and Ends
If reaching and teaching the whole child are part of your educational focus, too, my book, Can I Be in Your Class? is one to add to your collection. Please let me know what you think after you read it.

May 2018 overflow with educational blessings for you!

Denise
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